The only costs associated with a good website are your domain (about $10/year through NameCheap), hosting (SiteGround, even A2 if you want really cheap…about $5/month or less), and a WordPress theme (there are some good free ones but most of the big guys use StudioPress which is a $100 one-time cost). WordPress.org is free and can be installed in your hosting account.
Freelancer – refer people to developers, designers, and other freelancers you’ve worked with and make 100% of Freelancer’s project commission for the first 90 days. I get a lot of people requesting WordPress speed optimization services… so I refer them to my developers with a freelancer affiliate link and make $125/month in passive income. You can’t use affiliate links to link to specific freelancer profiles, so I direct people to the homepage via affiliate link and give people my developer’s usernames.
There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flexjobs, SolidGigs, Contena, greatcontent or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards.
Just be sure to put a lot of care into your product listings. Everything from the titles you use, to how effective the description is at convincing potential buyers your product is better than the rest, and even taking care to shoot high quality product photos can have a dramatic impact on your sales. I recommend using photo editing tools like Fotor, which gives you the ability to edit your images, create captivating graphic designs and more.
Double check yourself, before you double wreck yourself. Make sure everything you send to a company, whether a résumé, an email or a portfolio, is good to go. Double check your grammar and wording, and for God’s sake use spell check! This is especially important when it comes to the company’s name. Don’t spell their name wrong and be sure to type it how they type it (e.g. Problogger, not Pro Blogger).
So, use Google Autocomplete and other keyword research tools to find opportunities to sell affiliate products (or more so, help people find a solution), and see what’s out there. Analyze the top results and learn your competition. I spend many hours searching for “good” keywords so I can write articles that would not only rank well, but also convert since these people are looking for solutions on making their website faster.

I am a teacher & mom but just started as an Independent Consultant for Jamberry Nails in October! love it and love the wraps! Jamberry is a family and my team is a sisterhood….we support each other, assist each other and lift each other up! We have one of the top compensation plans in direct sales! You are your own boss…work when you want! It’s Jamazing!
I am a STAM working 3 jobs… all part time and from home… (can u believe it?) But really, I started with the mystery shopping, and that was OK. The positive was you get paid, the challenge was not frequently and sometimes needed to wait a month for payment to be transferred to the paypal account. Then I became and infant massage teacher and love this. REDTENTSALE is my Ebay store, I sell so many various items I find from wholesellers and it’s nice, I do this when the kids are asleep; anyone can… very manageable and nice “but light” income. I would say the one by far that is taking me places is Real Estate Marketing.
Find your niche partners, collaborators, and champions: As you’re creating your course, look for notable people who are also creating content in the space. Look at how their businesses operate and incorporate that into your own plan. You can also reach out to any influencers and make them affiliates for your own course. This way, they’ll be incentivized to share your content with their own audiences (which can be a major way to generate your first sales—it helps if you're using one of the best CRMs for small business—and start building your own community!)

Always disclose your affiliate relationship. Most visitors will probably understand that graphic ad will lead to your getting paid, but if you write a review or use an in-text link as a recommendation, you want your readers to know that may lead to compensation as well. This ensures you retain transparency and trust with your readers, but also, it's required by the FTC's endorsement rules.
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