I basically write tutorials on how to make your website load faster while saying “hosting is the #1 factor of website speed and SiteGround was rated the #1 host in 34 Facebook polls. They’re also used by Yoast, recommended by WordPress, and they will migrate you for free. Many people have already migrated to SiteGround and posted faster load times on Twitter.”
Hi there! Thanks so much for this site. I heard about affiliate marketing many years ago but was always intimidated to get started as I did not know where to start. I thought it would be super complicated but after reading yuor blog, you make it sound so easy! I was just wondering if you could tell me if I am correct with my assumption and understanding on how to do this successfully-

Theme – you don’t need a special theme for affiliate marketing, you probably just need a blog. I recommend StudioPress themes since that’s what Yoast, Matt Cutts (from Google), and I use. Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress also recommends them. One of the biggest mistakes I made was using a theme from Themeforest… since they’re built by independent developers who may stop making updates to their theme. This happened to me and I hear horror stories all the time about people having to switch themes and redesign their entire site. I’ve been using the same StudioPress theme (Outreach Pro) for 3 years. Their themes are lightweight (load fast), SEO-friendly via optimized code, secure, and they have a huge selection of plugins for the Genesis Framework and an awesome community in the Genesis WordPress Facebook Group. They include documentation for setting it up and will serve you for many, many years.
2. Of course, nearly all my readers are using WP so I’m biased. But even so, most successful affiliates use WordPress. There are less restrictions in terms of hosting (site speed), design customizations, plugins, cloaking affiliate links, lots of things. I would setup a free wordpress.com site just so you can play with the dashboard and see how you like it. Who knows, you might find a theme you really like (eg. StudioPress) and want to make the transition. I would at least test it out…it’s better to make the transition earlier than later.

Running errands and other odd jobs. Users of TaskRabbit.com post any task they need help with, ranging from data entry to delivering balloons from a shop to a home. TaskRabbits bid for the jobs and get paid upon completion. I have hired a “Rabbit” to deliver a truck full of diapers to a charity event. My friend Lynn hired a tech-savvy Rabbit to create a themed playlist for a baby shower. If you can handle doing someone’s grocery shopping while you do your own, this could be for you.

Amazon Mechanical Turk is a service that lets you make money online through doing paid microtasks. Each task is something simple that requires human interaction like rating search results, checking for the right spelling on search terms, categorizing the tone of an article, or even basic translating. You can do these tasks from anywhere you want and make money online from the world’s largest e-retailer.

So, I have 5 kids, 3 girls and 2 boys that I love very much and I would love to give them so much more. There are so many of these “work at home jobs” that you really need to be careful which to take action on. Believe me I’ve been “suckered” in many of them because I became desperate I guess. So I found this blog and must say: There’s no need to be skeptical. Everything takes some work to get started but, that’s what’s fun about potentially having your own online business. I love having multiple streams or income so, I am currently looking at a couple on here as well as running my own site currently as well at brandonandted. Thanks for such a informative site which I truly believe is very helpful!
And while it will take time to build up a big-enough audience to attract advertisers and other ways to make extra income from your podcast, the opportunity is there. John Lee Dumas interviews entrepreneurs seven days a week for his podcast Entrepreneur on Fire and now makes more than $200,000 a month from it. In fact, John publishes all his income online and showed that he’s made almost $13 million since launching in 2012.
Thank you so much for you article. I’ve read your article and am working on reading some of the mentioned articles within yours. I am not currently a stay at home mom, I work Mon-Fri 8-5 for our counties MHMRA. My job is crazy stressful and I have been wanting something different for a while. I have 2 boys 8 and 14 and both are active in Scouts and Swimming so having the flexibility to get them to all of their activates was already complicated. But in March of this year I also took on the role of caregiver for my elderly mother who has had some serious health issues and now lives with my family. So not only am I still struggling to keep up with my kids schedules and work full time I now have to get my mom back and forth to her many doctor appointments with some of her doctors being more than 30 miles from where we live.

Mechanical Turk: Amazon's Mechanical Turk is a resource for doing human-intelligence tasks, or as the site commonly refers to them, HITs. You get paid a very small fee for any given HIT and you'll need a good deal of volume to make a substantial amount of money. But it is a resource you can use in your spare time to generate a small income online. 
It’s sometimes hard to comprehend just how much people love t-shirts. And with the right niche, marketing and tools, you can create an online t-shirt business that makes you extra money online while you sleep. (Even Bloomberg and Forbes feature stories from entrepreneurs who've done just that.) Services like TeeSpring make it easier than ever to create a t-shirt drop-shipping business where they handle the sales, printing, and shipping, and you’re only responsible for design and marketing. Or you can even buy into well-established franchise businesses like Rhea Lana that sell fashionable, affordable kids clothing and get the backing of a proven organization to fuel your online sales. For more tips, check out this simple guide to launching and marketing an online clothing store by my friends over at Selz.
Google Autocomplete – go to google.com, start typing a phrase and look at the dropdown autocomplete results. You can use the underscore character “_” to have Google fill-in-the-blank. Just make sure the last character you type is an underscore. Try using plurals and change the word ordering to see different results. This is how I find 90% of my keywords.

Always disclose your affiliate relationship. Most visitors will probably understand that graphic ad will lead to your getting paid, but if you write a review or use an in-text link as a recommendation, you want your readers to know that may lead to compensation as well. This ensures you retain transparency and trust with your readers, but also, it's required by the FTC's endorsement rules.
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